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POLICE USING "DESTROYED" LONG-GUN REGISTRY DATA

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The NFA asks three federal government commissions for full investigation into apparent uses of firearms registry information.

Canada's National Firearms Association now has evidence and testimony from three cases where Canadian police forces have used information from the long-gun registry that was supposed to be destroyed in accordance with an Act of Parliament. Today, NFA President Sheldon Clare sent formal complaints to three federal commissions: the Privacy Commissioner, the Information Commissioner and the Commissioner for Public Complaints Against the RCMP.

On April 12, 2012 the Conservative Government announced passage of Bill C-19, Ending of the Long-Gun Registry Act. Bill C-19 required the deletion of all data held by the RCMP and provincial CFOs associated with the non-restricted firearms registration records collected since the coming into force of the Firearms Act on December 1, 1998 (emphasis added). In the RCMP Commissioner's 2012 Firearms Report tabled in Parliament he reported: In October 2012, the RCMP deleted all (except those of Quebec) electronic records identified as being related to the registration of non-restricted firearms in the Canadian Firearms Information System. http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/rep-rap/2012-comm-rpt/highlights-gran...

President Clare continued, "To date the NFA has identified three instances where long-gun registry data was used or suspected of being used by police after Parliament passed this law ordering that long-gun information be destroyed: the Ottawa area in June of 2012, High River, Alberta in June of 2013, and Fredericton, New Brunswick in June of 2013. The only case we are at liberty to make public at this time is the incident in High River that we reported on December 17, 2013." https://nfa.ca/news/nfa-fifth-letter-rcmp-public-complaints-commissioner

"It would seem from the information obtained from our members that all copies of the long-gun registry were not destroyed and that the long-gun registry is still being used by police in some provinces. The Police are clearly in contempt of Parliament. We demand that each case be investigated and a report made to Parliament so the government can take the necessary action to bring these police forces into compliance with the law. Any firearms owners who suspect the information from the long-gun registry has been used since it was supposed to be destroyed, please contact the NFA," concluded Clare.

Canada's National Firearms Association is this country's largest and most effective organization representing the interests of firearms owners.