Home
Find us on Facebook
Military Watches

Featured Article

Five Most Secret Military Aircraft

Shortly after midnight on 1 May, 2011 two unusual helicopters carrying 25 U.S. Navy SEALS descended on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbotabad, Pakistan. The heavily modified Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters were able to fly 200 km undetected from the Afghanistan border with neighbors reporting that they didn’t hear the helicopters until they were directly overhead. Their existence might have remained secret had one of the helicopters not crash landed on the wall of the compound. U. S. forces destroyed the crashed black Hawk with explosives, but a portion of the tail section survived. Revealing top secret stealth modifications stemming from a program that has supposedly been discontinued in 2006.

BOSTON POLICE CHIEF: I WANT TO CHOOSE IF YOU OWN A SHOTGUN OR RIFLE

Remarks Made During NPR Interview
By SOF

The chief of the Boston Police Department wants to decide whether a law-abiding citizen can own a rifle or shotgun. Police commissioner William Evans made the comment while being interviewed on WGBH, Boston’s NPR affiliate.

A Kimber 8400 Patrol Tactical Rifle. Ownership of bolt-action rifles like this would be up to the whim of a police chief if legislation passed by the Massachusetts State House were to become law.

THINK YOU ARE BADASS? THINK AGAIN!

A Hero Named Earl and Why is Law to Protect Canine's Stalled?

WHERE IS THE CARE FOR THESE VETS?
Four-Legged Heroes Don’t Get Help
By SOF

This is the story of two war heroes, Rex and Earl in the video. Rex E168 is a real hero. He served three tours in Iraq, and was wounded in action. During his tours, he helped save the lives of dozens of Coalition Forces. However, this is one vet who, despite suffering from PTSD, and suffering from disabilities related to his combat service, is not getting any help from the VA or the Department of Defense in the two-plus years since he retired.

AND NOW FOR A LOOK AT RED FLAG!

BERETTA WALKS FROM MARYLAND

HOWITZER TAKES 700 FOOT FALL

No Injuries in Incident
By SOF

During a training exercise at Camp Grayling, the Michigan National Guard reported that a M777 howitzer fell over 700 feet while being airlifted by a CH-47 Chinook helicopter. No injuries were reported in the incident.

HOW TO FIRE A SAM FOR DUMMIES?

Simulator Can Let You See For Yourself
By SOF

Could pro-Russian separatists in the eastern portion of the Ukraine have trained themselves on how to operate a missile system like the SA-11 Gadfly used in the downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17? The answer may be surprising.

Navy Coastal Riverine SAREX

THE BADASS BRADLEY

Meet America’s Infantry and Cavalry Fighting Vehicle
By SOF Editor

The year was 1981. For many of the Soldiers in the U.S. Army’s infantry branch, their ride into battle was the M113 armored personnel carrier. It was a vehicle that was reliable and simple, but it was horribly outclassed by the Soviet-build BMP family of vehicles, the first of which had entered service in 1966. The previous August, an improved BMP had entered service.

BLACK SEA ROTATIONAL FORCE IN ACTION!

Death of a famous old warrior

image.jpg

SOF joins James Garner fans everywhere in saying goodby to an old warrior. He charmed us for years. On the screen, he played a charming rogue. He perfected roles of courageous heroes and was one of America's favorite cowboys.

Killed "In Action" by a 16 year old Afghani

Sgt. Michael Cable, 26, Of Philpot, Ky. was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Ky.

He was on duty with other soldiers, guarding Afghan and U.S. officials attending a swearing in ceremony of Afghan Local Police in Shinwar district in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan near the Pakistan border 27 March 2013. The troops secured the area. Cable was playing with a group of curious Afghan children gathered around. A 16 year old stabbed him in the back of the neck. Reports are that the teenager later joined the extremists.

Cable was due to come back to the Untied States in a few months time. R.I.P. brother.

AN AMERICAN SPARTAN SPEAKS OUT ON ROE

In this excerpt from the interview RKB did with Maj. Jim Gant that appeared in the June, 2014 issue of SOF, the trouble that the Rules of Engagement and risk-averse REMFs caused is outlined.

[img_assist|nid=19492|title=ROE.jpeg|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=640|height=480]
In Gant's white paper, "One Tribe at a Time," he maintained, "...that to be successful, the military chain of command had to give the Special Forces teams working with the tribal forces unusual trust and latitude. They needed to be able to hit targets quickly, gaining approval if necessary through a single radio call instead of having to abide by the standard, glacial rules of engagement. They had to fight side by side with the tribal forces, not in segregated teams. They had to be free from burdensome reporting requirements and have greater leeway to spend money to benefit the local communities (this will sound familiar to most Vietnam Green Beret vets)."

TACTICAL LESSONS FROM THE GREATEST GENERATION

What World War II paratroopers can teach us about how to respond to active shooters
By Nick Perna

The rule of LGOPS:
“After the demise of the best airborne plan, a most terrifying effect occurs on the battlefield. The effect is known as the rule of LGOPS (little groups of paratroopers). This is, in its purest form, small groups of pissed-off, 1-year-old paratroopers. They are well trained. They are armed to the teeth and lack serious adult supervision. They collectively remember the commander’s intent as, “March to the sound of the guns and kill anyone who is not dressed like you” – or something like that. Happily they go about the day’s work…”
Unknown author

This is what happened during the Normandy invasion almost 70 years ago during World War II. Over 13,000 paratroopers from American and British units parachuted into France and landed as far as 18 miles from their designated drop zones. The initial plan, which was essential to the success of the overall invasion, appeared to be falling apart. Fortunately, airborne soldiers from all types of units banded together and took objectives such as French cities and key road intersections. The confusion alone caused the Germans all kinds of headaches, tying up much of their manpower dealing with the mayhem the paratroopers caused. Follow-on forces arrived by sea, eventually relieving their airborne counterparts, but not until the paratroopers had seized most of their objectives and had put a significant hurt on the Nazi war machine.