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DUMB GUN LAWS IN NEW YORK

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From the perspective of a long time Second Amendment activist, I have been forced to conclude that New York has some of the most Draconian and dumb gun control laws. Admittedly, there is competition from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and New Jersey. They also have some real dandies when it comes to ineffective and stupid laws involving firearms.

We have lived with the Sullivan Law which calls for the licensing of handgun owners and the registration of all handguns. I have spoken to several cops, district attorneys, lawyers and politicians and asked them how many gun crimes have been solved because the gun was registered. I have yet to hear a positive number from any of them.

Of course registration works. It worked wonderfully well for Adolph Hitler and several other dictators. It certainly destroyed any meaningful attempts to rescue the citizens from oppression. In fact, it is difficult to find any republic or democracy that was taken over by a dictator without first imposing gun control and registration. It sure made it convenient for those in power to disarm the citizens.

The term “gun control” can be misleading because it isn’t about controlling guns. It is about controlling people. The laws affect only honest citizens because criminals don’t obey laws—that’s why they are called criminals. The ironic part of the registration law is that criminals can’t be charged with not registering a firearm. The Supreme Court said it would be a violation of their Fifth Amendment rights.

But, back to the dumb gun laws in New York. It takes a few months to a year in the Empire State to get a pistol permit. In Pennsylvania it takes less than an hour and this includes permits for non-residents. The difference in crime statistics involving guns between the states is insignificant.

The real objective of the anti-gun politicians is to make guns illegal for all but their favored few. That was the objective of Tim Sullivan who got the law passed. That’s why an upstate cop can’t legally carry a handgun in the Big Apple unless he is on duty and has the OK from the Police Commissioner. That is a real crime stopper!

The big push for this legislative session is called microstamping which is an unproven technology that is supposed to create an imprint on fired cartridge cases. It has yet to be shown to work. It is a method (politicians say) to put a mark on the case that will link it to the gun that fired it.

There are a couple of big problems with this bill. First, it is obvious that the sponsors want to keep manufacturers from selling semi-automatic handguns in New York. We have not, so far, found any major manufacturer that is willing to invest on this technology for the whims of politicians in one state.

The second problem is that most guns used in crimes are stolen or bought off the street. An offshoot (pardon the pun) is that a criminal could pick up fired brass at a gun club range, commit a crime and use a brass catcher to avoid leaving his cases at a crime scene and drop the other cases. Wouldn’t that be confusing?

Most significant is the fact that a gun with the imprinting ability can be easily altered to defeat the microstamping. A file, power drill with a hone and some valve grinding compound could remove the identifying marking images. That would make the system totally ineffective.

Several years ago Governor Pataki instituted the CoBIS system which requires any semi-auto handgun sold at a gun store to provide a fired case and give to the State Police for their records. It is difficult to get an exact figure of the cost, but a good guess is around $20 million. In the decade it has been in existence, not one crime case has been solved with this program.

We had a report that one third of the cases sent to Albany for the data base had not yet been entered. What a waste of taxpayer’s money!

This would be a good time to contact legislators and the governor to tell them to forget about this bill and use their time doing something useful.

Article by Budd Schroeder