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COMMUNIST CHINA’S THREE WARS AGAINST AMERICA

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Jiangkai-class frigate

Psychological, Legal, and Media Ops Used Against United States
By Harold Hutchison

The ChiComs are waging three forms of warfare against the United States, seeking to drive the United States away from commitments to allies in East and Southeast Asia. That is the conclusion of a 566-page report by the Office of Net Assessment, a DOD think tank, that warns the United States lacks the tools to counter the ChiCom strategy.

According to a report by the Washington Free Beacon, the ChiComs have been waging warfare n the psychological, legal, and media arenas, a strategy called the “Three Warfares.” Their operations are intended to de-legitimize any American presence. One such use of those operations was after a near-collision between the cruiser USS Cowpens and a ChiCom naval vessel.

“Our war colleges and military research traditions emphasize kinetic exchange, the positioning and destruction of assets, and metrics that measure success by kill ratios and infrastructure destruction,” the report said. “By adopting the Three Warfares as an offensive weapon, the Chinese have side-stepped the coda of American military science.”

“The Three Warfares is a dynamic three dimensional war-fighting process that constitutes war by other means,” Professor Stefan Halper of Cambridge University told the Free Beacon, noting that it was China’s strategy of choice in the South China Sea, where it has maritime boundary disputes with the Philippines and Vietnam. The Philippines have been making an effort to upgrade their navy in recent years.

The study noted that the ChiCom operations intend to “diminish or rupture U.S. ties with the South China Sea littoral states and deter governments from providing forward basing facilities or other support.” One audience for those operations may be the United States itself.

The ChiComs have even been pressuring Hollywood to avoid themes that might paint China in a bad light. One such example was the studio’s decision to alter the re-make of Red Dawn to make the North Koreans, and not the ChiComs, the bad guys.

The report suggested a number of efforts, including a White House office to coordinate efforts to counter the “Three Warfares” strategy. “If the Three Warfares is not a ‘game changer,’ it certainly has the capacity to modify the game in substantial ways,” the report said.